Links : [H]ard|Folding [H]ard|OCP
Local

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

GMT

[H] Member Login

Remember
[H]ard|Folding Badges have been upgraded, please update your links. You are now being re-directed.

Stanford's goal: to understand protein folding, protein aggregation, and related diseases.



What are proteins and why do they "fold"? Proteins are biology's workhorses -- its "nanomachines." Before proteins can carry out their biochemical function, they remarkably assemble themselves, or "fold." The process of protein folding, while critical and fundamental to virtually all of biology, remains a mystery. Moreover, perhaps not surprisingly, when proteins do not fold correctly (i.e. "misfold"), there can be serious effects, including many well known diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Mad Cow (BSE), CJD, ALS, and Parkinson's disease.

What does Folding@Home do? Folding@Home is a distributed computing project which studies protein folding, misfolding, aggregation, and related diseases. Stanford uses novel computational methods and large scale distributed computing, to simulate timescales thousands to millions of times longer than previously achieved. This has allowed us to simulate folding for the first time, and to now direct Stanford's approach to examine folding related disease.



How to Join | Project Faqs | Project Add-ons | Statistics | Download Client
New Members
[ 3 ]
 Republic4709/21/14 
 M._Daniel09/20/14 
 Brian_Northcutt09/15/14 
E-cigarettes 'not helping cancer patients to quit smoking'
Curcumin, special peptides boost cancer-blocking PIAS3 to neutralize cancer-activating STAT3 in mesothelioma
Adding chemotherapy to radiation treatment not effective in treating vulvar cancer, UPMC study shows
Imaging of metastatic cancer may be revolutionized by new non-invasive technique
Mapping complex trait genes in multiparental populations
The eyes of flies reveal abnormal properties of cancer protein
Researchers shed light on how breast implants may cause rare lymphoma
Neck surgery unnecessary for many throat cancer patients
For recurrent head and neck cancers a combination of targeted radiation and drug therapy is less toxic
Exercise can enhance tumor-shrinking effects of chemotherapy
More accurate treatment, greater patient comfort provided by new radiosurgery technology
Preserved mobility in malignant spinal cord compression
Cancer resistance may one day be treated with epigenetic drugs
New molecule 'allows umbilical cord stem cells to multiply'
Global team finds new genetic variants that raise risk of prostate cancer
Master regulator of cells' heat shock response identified
Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey studying low participation in cancer screenings by South Asian population
Cell surface sugars can promote or inhibit cancer depending upon stage
A single protein can mean the difference between life-long chronic infection or cure for hepatitis
Potential for targeted treatments with new knowledge of genes driving bladder cancer
Final pieces to the circadian clock puzzle found
Specific baldness pattern linked with increased prostate cancer risk
American Association for Cancer Research releases 2014 cancer progress report: research is transforming lives
Cancer Council publishes first Australian guidelines on Barrett's Oesophagus and oesophageal adenocarcinoma
Research sheds light on cognitive losses seen with chemotherapy, autoimmune diseases
Impaired brain signaling pathway 'may be a cause of Alzheimer's'
World Alzheimer Report 2014: the key points
UB researchers corroborate the neuroprotective effects of Sirtuin 1 activation on mice with Alzheimer's disease
Concussion-related brain disease identified in living brain
Sedentary behavior 'may counteract brain benefits of exercise in older adults'
Dementia risk reduction through tobacco control and better prevention, detection and control of hypertension and diabetes
Measuring modified protein structures
The cell recognizes the buildup of misfolded proteins, offers insight into Alzheimer's, ALS, Huntington's, Parkinson's, and type 2 diabetes
Brain may 'work around' early Alzheimer's damage
The young brains of city dwellers harmed by air pollution
Discovery may lead to improved memory, cognitive function in Alzheimer's patients
In mouse model of Alzheimer's disease, targeted immune booster removes toxic proteins
sPIF protects against neuronal death and brain injury
Memory loss more common in people with blood type AB
Poor recording of physical health and medication could be causing dementia trials to fail
Neurodegenerative diseases can be caused by broken signals
Increased Alzheimer's risk linked to long-term benzodiazepine use
Gene 'may slow aging of entire body when activated in key organs'
Patients with advanced dementia continue receiving medications of questionable benefit
Apolipoprotein E and apolipoprotein CI are involved in cognitive impairment progression in Chinese late-onset Alzheimer's disease
Researchers track harmful immune reactions in the brain, suggest reason why HIV patients develop dementia
Association between diabetes mellitus, mild cognitive impairment and being middle aged and older
Memory and Alzheimer's disease
Older adults who volunteer are more likely to be happier and healthier
Pilot study of socially-assistive robots that help children with autism to learn imitative behavior
Healthy humans 'harbor an average of five viruses'
Pupil size shows reliability of decisions
Endocrine-related protein found to be master regulator in other important diseases
How do I smell? Much the same as how you see
Ebola virus protein offers potential drug target
Glaucoma cure may lie in targeting 'stiff cells' that impede fluid drainage
Is the pattern of brain folding a "fingerprint" for schizophrenia?
Scientists reset human stem cells in 'significant milestone' in medicine
Deactivating a cell protein may halt progress of rheumatoid arthritis
Gene 'may slow aging of entire body when activated in key organs'
Important regulators of immune cell response identified
Movable cytoskeleton membrane fabricated for first time
Genetic link identified between the circadian clock and seasonal timing
Body clock link could aid obesity treatments
Are females more susceptible to effects of marijuana?
Corals could provide a general model for understanding ciliary processes related to mass transport and disease
A call to investigators to study mysterious cloud-like collections in cells
Are molecular mechanisms to blame for how stress affects us?
New type of cell movement discovered
Research reveals mechanism behind cell protein remodeling within a family of cancers
Artificial virus improves delivery of new generations of pharmaceuticals
Stem cell breakthrough for 'Cinderella cells'
Neanderthals and modern humans co-existed for thousands of years
Scientists grow fully functional thymus in mice from scratch
MRC publishes a review of the UK molecular pathology landscape
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 158
  • Pages: 32
Folding@home highlighted in Biophysical Journal
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 103
Points: 2,857,126
Work Units: 6,701

Posted: Wed Aug 27, 2014 12:46 pm
Recent work from Folding@home highlighted in Biophysical Journal

Quote:
by Vijay Pande

Our recent work on understanding how protein misfolding occurs (http://www.cell.com/biophysj/abstract/S0006-3495(14)00722-X) has shed light on the nature of misfolding and potential subsequent aggregation (relevant for protein misfolding disease), demonstrating that misfolded states are more prevalent than would be expected, especially due to their metastability (once you get into a misfolded state, its really hard to get out of it).



Full Article: here.


New results for Opa proteins

Quote:
by Peter Kasson

Were excited to share some recent results from our lab that combine simulation and experimental structural biology. This has been a wonderful collaboration with my colleague Linda Columbus, a Chemistry professor at the University of Virginia. We are interested in how Neisseria bacteria recognize and infect cells. This is an important problem #1 because Neisseria are becoming increasingly drug-resistance and #2 because these mechanisms can be borrowed for targeted drug delivery.


Full Article: here.

Folding/Chrome to Reveal the Secrets Behind the Type II Diabetes
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 103
Points: 2,857,126
Work Units: 6,701

Posted: Thu Jul 24, 2014 03:33 am
Quote:
by Huang

In the past couple of years, Xuhui Huangs group at HKUST
(http://compbio.ust.hk/) has performed large-scale molecular dynamics
simulations at Folding@Home (Project 2974-2975) to investigate the
mis-folding of the hIAPP (human islet amyloid polypeptide, also called
amylin).

Like other misfolding peptides, hIAPP is generally unstructured in
water solution but adopts an alpha-helix structure when binds to the
cellular membrane. Around 95% of patients with Type II diabetes
exhibit large deposits of misfolded hIAPP (beta-sheet fibrils). The
aggregation of this peptide is suggested to induce apoptotic
cell-death in insulin-producing β-cells that may further cause the
development of the type II diabetes. Using Markov state models
constructed from many molecular dynamics simulations, we have
identified the metastable conformational states of the hIAPP monomer
and the dynamics of transitioning between them. We show that even
though the overall structure of the hIAPP peptide lacks a dominant
folded structure, there exist a large number of reasonably populated
metastable conformational states. Among them, a few states containing
substantial amounts of β-hairpin secondary structure and extended
hydrophobic surfaces may further induce the nucleation of hIAPP
aggregation and eventually form the fibrils. These results were
published at Qin, Bowman, and Huang, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 135 (43),
1609216101, (2013) (http://pubs.acs.org/doi/full/10.1021/ja403147m).



Full Article: here.
Update on drug design successes with Folding@home
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 103
Points: 2,857,126
Work Units: 6,701

Posted: Sat Jun 28, 2014 08:53 am
Vijay gave a brief talk on drug design successes with Folding@home.

Quote:
by Vijay Pande

In the Stanford Big Data conference in 2014, I gave a talk which gives an update on our drug design efforts, summarizing a bit on how FAH works to design drugs and were we are in some areas (but not all alas, its only a 12 minute talk, so I had to be pretty brief).



Link to video here.
Stanford Webinar
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 103
Points: 2,857,126
Work Units: 6,701

Posted: Mon May 26, 2014 03:11 am
Stanford is holding a "Webinar".

Quote:
by Vijay Pande

Please join us on June 3rd for a webinar presented by Vijay Pande, Professor of Chemistry, Structural Biology, and Computer Science at Stanford University and the founder of the Folding@Home project. Professor Pande will give a brief introduction to Folding@home and successes in the project so far. He will also discuss plans to greatly enhance Folding@home capabilities through new initiatives.


The webinar is scheduled to take place on June 3rd at 9am, it requires registration at the link below.

Registration Link

Progress on connecting computation with experiment
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 103
Points: 2,857,126
Work Units: 6,701

Posted: Mon Apr 28, 2014 09:34 pm
Stanford has made progress with their experiment to capture millisecond events through Folding@Home and Markov state models.

Quote:
By Greg Bowman


Many biologically relevant conformational changes occur on milliseconds and slower timescales. Furthermore, many experimental techniques are only sensitive to milliseconds and slower timescales. Therefore, our ability to reliably capture millisecond timescale events through the use of Folding@home and Markov state models opens up a host of exciting possibilities.


Full Article: here.
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 158
  • Pages: 32
Administrator Council News Member

[H]ard|Folding Copyright © 2001 - 2014 by King_N,   [H]ard|OCP Copyright © 1998 - 2013 by Kyle Bennett

All trademarks used are properties of their respective owners. All rights reserved.