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Stanford's goal: to understand protein folding, protein aggregation, and related diseases.



What are proteins and why do they "fold"? Proteins are biology's workhorses -- its "nanomachines." Before proteins can carry out their biochemical function, they remarkably assemble themselves, or "fold." The process of protein folding, while critical and fundamental to virtually all of biology, remains a mystery. Moreover, perhaps not surprisingly, when proteins do not fold correctly (i.e. "misfold"), there can be serious effects, including many well known diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Mad Cow (BSE), CJD, ALS, and Parkinson's disease.

What does Folding@Home do? Folding@Home is a distributed computing project which studies protein folding, misfolding, aggregation, and related diseases. Stanford uses novel computational methods and large scale distributed computing, to simulate timescales thousands to millions of times longer than previously achieved. This has allowed us to simulate folding for the first time, and to now direct Stanford's approach to examine folding related disease.



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  • News Articles: 153
  • Pages: 31
Congratulations to Michael Levitt
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Mon Oct 28, 2013 10:51 pm
Dr. Levitt a pioneer in using Molecular Dynamics to study proteins (a method which is at the heart of most of F@Hs calculations.) was awarded a Nobel Prize.

Quote:
Michael Levitt, PhD, has dramatically advanced the field of structural biology by developing sophisticated computer algorithms to build models of complex biological molecules.

Applying known three-dimensional structures and basic principles of physical chemistry as complementary guidelines, this modeling can, for example, predict a protein's molecular structure on the basis of that protein's amino-acid sequence.


Full Article : here.
GPU 16 core approaching end of life.
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Mon Sep 30, 2013 01:25 am
GPU Core 16 is now approaching end of life status.

Quote:
Our projects which use Core16 have completed and this means that Core16 is reaching its end of life, as the Core17 GPU core has some key features needed in new projects. We do not have an ETA for the last Core16 WU, but it is likely soon, i.e. in a week or two.
Reminder about aging cores (eg Core11, Core78)
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Tue Aug 27, 2013 12:26 am
Stanford has issued a reminder that certain cores are nearing "end of life" status.

Quote:
One aspect which has dominated FAH for a decade is the continual push for new scientific approaches. This manifests itself in terms of new scientific cores. For example, the new GPU core (Core17) has brought huge speed improvements (especially to AMD GPUs) and involved a complete rewrite.

A negative consequence of this continuous push for improvement and progress is that newer cores often are restricted to more advanced hardware. To help utilize as much power as is available to FAH, we tend to continue projects with older cores, but eventually, the science they can do becomes too limiting, and we must retire them.


Full Article here
A peek into Core 17 benchmarking
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 05:13 am
Quote:
Our primary goal with benchmarking is "equal points for equal work." However, making this process consistent over lots of different types of WUs and different types of hardware is tricky. We had an internal discussion about the PPD for two projects (7810 and 8900) recently and we thought donors might find these details interesting.


Full Article here
Computerized Brain-Fitness Program Improves Memory Of Older Adults
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Fri Jun 28, 2013 03:30 am
Quote:
UCLA researchers have found that older adults who regularly used a brain-fitness program on a computer demonstrated significantly improved memory and language skills.



Full Article: here



Robo-Pets May Contribute to Quality of Life for Those With Dementia

Quote:
A study has found that interacting with a therapeutic robot companion made people with mid- to late-stage dementia less anxious and also had a positive influence on their quality of life.



Full Article: here



Protein Identified That Contributes To Cognitive Decline In Alzheimer's Disease

Quote:
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have demonstrated that a protein called caspase-2 is a key regulator of a signaling pathway that leads to cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. The findings, made in a mouse model of Alzheimer's, suggest that inhibiting this protein could prevent the neuronal damage and subsequent cognitive decline associated with the disease. The study was published this month in the online journal Nature Communications.



Full Article: here
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 153
  • Pages: 31
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