Links : [H]ard|Folding [H]ard|OCP
Local

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

GMT

[H] Member Login

Remember

Stanford's goal: to understand protein folding, protein aggregation, and related diseases.



What are proteins and why do they "fold"? Proteins are biology's workhorses -- its "nanomachines." Before proteins can carry out their biochemical function, they remarkably assemble themselves, or "fold." The process of protein folding, while critical and fundamental to virtually all of biology, remains a mystery. Moreover, perhaps not surprisingly, when proteins do not fold correctly (i.e. "misfold"), there can be serious effects, including many well known diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Mad Cow (BSE), CJD, ALS, and Parkinson's disease.

What does Folding@Home do? Folding@Home is a distributed computing project which studies protein folding, misfolding, aggregation, and related diseases. Stanford uses novel computational methods and large scale distributed computing, to simulate timescales thousands to millions of times longer than previously achieved. This has allowed us to simulate folding for the first time, and to now direct Stanford's approach to examine folding related disease.



How to Join | Project Faqs | Project Add-ons | Statistics | Download Client
New Members
[ 3 ]
 DanielGordon04/16/14 
 Huberthans04/15/14 
 Voxelot04/11/14 
Research shows processing can affect size of nano carriers for targeted drug delivery
Study suggests gene panels as a useful, cheaper alternative to whole-genome sequencing
New blood test 'accurately predicts breast cancer recurrence'
New state-of-the-art educational platform for uro-onco professionals now online
Breakthrough technology to enable doctors to select more effective treatment for cancer patients on a personalised basis
Hepatocellular carcinoma: new advances in diagnosis, staging and treatment all predicted to improve patient outcomes
How and when nerve and brain cells are formed could open doors to targeted cancer therapies
Genetic evidence supports role virus-fighting genes in cancer development
New strategies suggested for kidney regeneration by gene linked to Wilms tumors, a pediatric kidney cancer
ZMYND11 'reads' methylated variant to thwart cancer; tied to breast cancer patient survival
Too much of a protein called c-FLIPR can trigger autoimmune diseases
Tough liver cancer may be treated with immunotherapy
Discovery of latent bioluminescence in fruit flies holds promise for expanded use of bioluminescence imaging tools
3D-printed kidneys could become standard for simulated cancer surgery
Chemotherapy before or after surgery for high-risk bladder cancer improves survival, but is not routinely administered
Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer: Genetic evidence supports role of gene family in cancer development
Genetic changes associated with epigenetic changes increase risk of developing cancer
3D model of a cancerous tumour created using a 3D printer
Factors that impact the longevity of adult survivors of childhood cancer
Genetic clues on drug response provided by yeast
Key to stronger, more effective antibiotics could be enzyme 'wrench'
Bladder cancer: therapeutic options and bladder-preserving strategies
Transcription factors identified that distinguish glioblastoma stem cells
Growth factor receptors identified that may prompt the spread of lung cancer
Commission suggests improvements to cancer care in China, India and Russia
Modified stem cells may offer way to treat Alzheimer's disease
Gene variant gives women higher risk for Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's disease research could be revolutionized by new mouse model
Could Silly Putty help treat neurological disorders?
Researchers at the University of Valencia discover new molecules against Alzheimer's disease
Improving cognition later in life through physical activity
Innovative, coordinated brain care could save billions of health care dollars
Why is there an inverse association between cancer and Alzheimer's?
New dementia care models to improve care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease
Working memory boosted by green tea
Caring for grandkids once a week keeps grandmas sharp
Presymptomatic diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease will alter life with a 'brain at risk'
Likely connection between white matter and cognitive health
2 new studies find no evidence of Alzheimer's disease-associated changes in adolescents carrying genetic risk factors
African Americans may be at a greatly increased risk for Alzheimer's disease
Complex relationship between slow-wave sleep and odor memory revealed
Green tea may boost our working memory
Scientists discover big clue to how caffeine wards off Alzheimer's
No evidence of Alzheimer's Disease-associated changes in adolescents carrying genetic risk factors
Breakthrough may revolutionize the study of modern-day enzymes
The origin of Lou Gehrig's disease may have just been discovered
How zinc regulates a key enzyme involved in cell death
Dog watch - How attention changes in the course of a dog's life
'Sewing machine' idea gives insight into origins of Alzheimer's
'Thinking skills best in people who had better cardio fitness in youth'
Research shows processing can affect size of nano carriers for targeted drug delivery
Study on Mt. Everest shows how people get type 2 diabetes
Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer: Genetic evidence supports role of gene family in cancer development
Researchers at the University of Valencia discover new molecules against Alzheimer's disease
Key to stronger, more effective antibiotics could be enzyme 'wrench'
New target in flu virus may open route to better drugs
Obsessive-compulsive disorder may reflect a propensity for bad habits
Team solves decades-old mystery of how cells keep from bursting
Researchers demonstrates advantages of the HOPE fixation strategy
How does the 'kissing disease' replicate itself?
Identification of <em>pelo</em>, a host gene needed for efficient virus production
New agents may revitalize antibiotics to fight superbugs
Higher blood pressure is linked to a lower tendency to worry
Method offers potential for understanding anti-bacterial resistance
Scientists discover key cells involved in touch sensation
The hormone that allows us to love may also encourage us to lie
The origin of Lou Gehrig's disease may have just been discovered
Scientists identify protein that spurs spread of colon cancer
Team identifies novel biomarker for head and neck cancer and non-small cell lung cancer
Cell metabolism discovery could spawn treatments for cancer or common cold
Cells measure surface area to know when to divide
Time, trust and transparency keys to minority biospecimen collection
The acrobatic motor protein Kif15 could pave the way for new cancer therapies
Plasma tool for destroying cancer cells
Researchers produce first comprehensive atlas of human genes
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 153
  • Pages: 31
Core 17 update
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Wed May 29, 2013 03:34 am
F@H GPU developer gives us a detailed video update of the new core 17 features.

Quote:
Some of the key highlights are:
-Up to 120,000 PPD on GTX Titan, and 110,000 PPD on HD 7970
-Support for more diverse simulations
-Linux support on NVIDIA cards and 64bit OSes
-FAHBench updated to use the latest OpenMM and display version information




Full article and video here
Potential Therapy For Alzheimer's
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Mon Apr 29, 2013 03:21 pm
Things have been pretty quiet this month, but I did manage to find a few interesting articles on Alzheimer's.


Alzheimer's Gene Discovery Offers Hope For Preventive Therapy

Quote:
Alzheimer's disease is the most common neurodegenerative disorder, affecting more than five million Americans, but currently there is no way to prevent, delay or stop its progression. A study published online by the Cell Press journal Neuron shows that a gene called CD33 contributes to Alzheimer's disease by inhibiting the ability of immune cells to remove toxic molecules in the brain.


Full Article here



Potential Therapeutic Targets Revealed For Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease

Quote:
Scientists from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in collaboration with researchers from Icelandic Heart Association, Sage Bionetworks, and other institutions, have discovered that a network of genes involved in the inflammatory response in the brain is a crucial mechanism driving Late Onset Alzheimer's Disease (LOAD). The findings, published online in the journal Cell, provide new understanding of key pathways and genes involved in LOAD and valuable insights to develop potential therapies for the disease.


Full Article here



Potential Therapy For Alzheimer's Disease Revealed By Gene Networks In Brains Of Deceased Patients

Quote:
Most information about the cause of Alzheimer's disease is based on studies from animal models. Now, a study published by Cell Press in the journal Cell examines the brain tissue of deceased human patients and sheds light on dysfunctions in molecular networks in the brain that are at the root of Alzheimer's disease.


Full Article here
FAH paper listed amongst best of 2012 by Biophysical Journal
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Tue Mar 26, 2013 03:16 am
It's been a busy month at Stanford, one of their papers was listed among the best of 2012 by Biophysical Journal, OpenMM now has it's own youtube channel, a new GPU core was released, and the new FaHBench Tool was released.

Quote:
Biophysical Journal announced their "Best of 2012" paper collection. We were excited that one of our papers was included. That work, "Protein Folding is Mechanistically Robust" investigates how key aspects of FAH technology (MSMs) can yield new insights into protein folding in some unexpected ways. Congratulations to Jeffery Weber for his work. We've posted the technical abstract below as well.


Full Article here



OpenMM Youtube channel

Quote:
OpenMM is a key part of Folding@home, powering its GPU cores. You can learn more about OpenMM at its youtube page, which includes technical videos on how you can incorporate OpenMM into your code. It also includes an introduction to Markov State Models (MSMs), which is a key technology used in Folding@home.


Full Article here



Introducing Folding@Home Core 17 GPU zeta core

Quote:
As also announced on OpenMM/Folding@home programmer Yutong "proteneer" Zhao's web site, we are happy to announce that Folding@Home Core 17 has entered Beta. Externally, you probably wont notice too much of a difference. Internally, this is a complete overhaul that brings many new features, and sets a strong foundation for the future of GPU core development. In addition, the restructuring brings much tighter integration of the core with the rest of the development within Folding@Home.


Full Article here



FAH bench FAH core/OpenMM-based benchmark for your GPU

Quote:
As previously blogged, FAHBench is the official Folding@Home GPU benchmark. It measures the compute performance of GPUs for Folding@Home. In addition, by use of a loadable DLL system, it provides vendors and skilled hackers with a method make customized-plugins and test their results.


Full Article here



GPU core progress & general design philosophy

Quote:
We often have to make difficult decisions on what hardware to support in the future, including adding new platforms or removing existing ones. Removing existing platforms always leads to a lot of disruptive change for donors, so we try to do this as rarely as we can. In particular, in the GPU1 to GPU2 transition, there was a big change done quickly, which was extremely hard on donors.


Full Article here



FAHBench 1.0

Quote:
Weve released FAHBench 1.0, with a new slick GUI that should make it much more accessible to new comers. Click on the FAHBench link above or the image below to try it out! Dont worry, it maintains backwards compatibility with the old command line interface.


Full Article here



Peptoid structure prediction

Quote:
Guest post from Dr. Greg Bowman, UC Berkeley

Prof. Vince Voelzs lab has published an exciting paper on their recent successes with predicting the structures of protein-like molecules called peptoids (here). Peptoids are similar to proteins but with a rearrangement in their chemistry (see example below). Their similarity to proteins allows peptoids to function like proteins.


Full Article here
New FAH client and video
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Sun Feb 24, 2013 04:02 pm
It looks like it's been a pretty busy month for Stanford, they released a new client and video.

Quote:
We've rolled out the latest version 7.3 client to the main web site. This new client should be much easier to install and comes with a new web interface which is simpler and easier to use.


Full article here

DNA- Repairing Protein May Be Key To Preventing Recurrence Of Some Cancers
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,736,559
Work Units: 6,433

Posted: Thu Jan 31, 2013 01:57 am
Quote:
Just as the body can become resistant to antibiotics, certain methods of killing cancer tumors can end up creating resistant tumor cells. But a University of Central Florida professor has found a protein present in several types of cancer, including breast and ovarian cancer, which could be helpful in preventing tumors from coming back.

The protein, KLF8, appears to protect tumor cells from drugs aimed at killing them and even aid the tumor cells ability to regenerate.



Full Article here
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 153
  • Pages: 31
Administrator Council News Member

[H]ard|Folding Copyright © 2001 - 2014 by King_N,   [H]ard|OCP Copyright © 1998 - 2013 by Kyle Bennett

All trademarks used are properties of their respective owners. All rights reserved.