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Stanford's goal: to understand protein folding, protein aggregation, and related diseases.



What are proteins and why do they "fold"? Proteins are biology's workhorses -- its "nanomachines." Before proteins can carry out their biochemical function, they remarkably assemble themselves, or "fold." The process of protein folding, while critical and fundamental to virtually all of biology, remains a mystery. Moreover, perhaps not surprisingly, when proteins do not fold correctly (i.e. "misfold"), there can be serious effects, including many well known diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Mad Cow (BSE), CJD, ALS, and Parkinson's disease.

What does Folding@Home do? Folding@Home is a distributed computing project which studies protein folding, misfolding, aggregation, and related diseases. Stanford uses novel computational methods and large scale distributed computing, to simulate timescales thousands to millions of times longer than previously achieved. This has allowed us to simulate folding for the first time, and to now direct Stanford's approach to examine folding related disease.



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 Boingo04/17/14 
Poor kidney function may boost cancer risk
Death rates from pancreatic cancer are rising while rates for all other cancers, except female lung cancer, continue to fall in Europe
'Dustman' protein helps bin cancer cells
Scientists find key steps linking dietary fats and colon cancer tumor growth
Fast, simple-to-use assay reveals the 'family tree' of cancer metastases
Gene within gene drives acute myeloid leukemia, says new study
FDA approves Cyramza for stomach cancer
The source identified of most cases of invasive bladder cancer
As genomic medicine expands, computational method dramatically speeds up estimates of gene expression
How peripheral pain occurs in nerves suggests new targets for pain relief
Advanced abdominal cancer: 20 years of data shows treatment technique improvement
Living devices may selectively kill cancer cells without disrupting healthy cells
Chronic prostate inflammation tied to nearly double risk of prostate cancer
Key cell division proteins also power up mitochondria; finding could influence cancer care and regenerative medicine
Non-stem cells may naturally replace lost stem cells; findings have implications for understanding cancer
Dedicated immune cells defend a single organ
Technique developed to reverse engineer cells may lead to therapeutic targets for disease
Research represents novel approach to lessening impact of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's
Off-the-shelf vaccine targeting dendritic cells can safely lead to robust humoral and cellular immunity
Isolating immune cells to study how they ward off oral diseases
Refined categorization may improve prediction of patient survival in RECIST 1.1
Blocking protein partnership has implications for cancer treatment
Ovarian cancer patients may benefit from nanoparticles designed to deliver three cancer drugs at a time
Gene variant makes eaters of processed meat 'more likely to get colorectal cancer'
Teens who conform to gender norms 'more likely to engage in cancer-risk behaviors'
Longer education linked to better recovery from traumatic brain injury
New approach 'DICE' may help manage the most troubling symptoms of dementia, lessen use of drugs
Mild cognitive impairment linked to early death in new research
Potential new approach to Alzheimer's treatment offered by 'Chaperone' compounds
New approach to Alzheimer's treatment found in novel class of compounds
Research represents novel approach to lessening impact of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's
Researchers discover brain activity that may mark memory formation
Neuroscientists explain how memories stick together
Apathy in older adults linked to increased brain shrinkage
Modified stem cells may offer way to treat Alzheimer's disease
Gene variant gives women higher risk for Alzheimer's
Alzheimer's disease research could be revolutionized by new mouse model
Could Silly Putty help treat neurological disorders?
Researchers at the University of Valencia discover new molecules against Alzheimer's disease
Improving cognition later in life through physical activity
Innovative, coordinated brain care could save billions of health care dollars
Why is there an inverse association between cancer and Alzheimer's?
New dementia care models to improve care for older adults with Alzheimer's disease
Working memory boosted by green tea
Caring for grandkids once a week keeps grandmas sharp
Presymptomatic diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease will alter life with a 'brain at risk'
Likely connection between white matter and cognitive health
2 new studies find no evidence of Alzheimer's disease-associated changes in adolescents carrying genetic risk factors
African Americans may be at a greatly increased risk for Alzheimer's disease
Complex relationship between slow-wave sleep and odor memory revealed
Simulating in tiny steps gave birth to long-sought-after method of drug development
The anti-inflammatory factory - how lipid mediators are produced
Fast, simple-to-use assay reveals the 'family tree' of cancer metastases
Vanderbilt study tracks new lung cancer drug target
Large number of antibiotic resistance genes discovered in cow manure
Stem cells show bizarre absorption property 'not seen before in cells'
New approach to Alzheimer's treatment found in novel class of compounds
Nature Bank opens the door to unlimited opportunities, starting with Parkinson's disease
Key 'sperm meets egg' protein discovery holds promise for fertility treatments
Research shows processing can affect size of nano carriers for targeted drug delivery
Study on Mt. Everest shows how people get type 2 diabetes
Virus-fighting genes linked to mutations in cancer: Genetic evidence supports role of gene family in cancer development
Researchers at the University of Valencia discover new molecules against Alzheimer's disease
Key to stronger, more effective antibiotics could be enzyme 'wrench'
New target in flu virus may open route to better drugs
Obsessive-compulsive disorder may reflect a propensity for bad habits
Team solves decades-old mystery of how cells keep from bursting
Researchers demonstrates advantages of the HOPE fixation strategy
How does the 'kissing disease' replicate itself?
Identification of <em>pelo</em>, a host gene needed for efficient virus production
New agents may revitalize antibiotics to fight superbugs
Higher blood pressure is linked to a lower tendency to worry
Method offers potential for understanding anti-bacterial resistance
Scientists discover key cells involved in touch sensation
The hormone that allows us to love may also encourage us to lie
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 153
  • Pages: 31
Searching for new drug targets
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,740,251
Work Units: 6,437

Posted: Sat Jul 28, 2012 12:22 am
Stanford has been busy this month, quite a bit of new news.

Searching for new drug targets

Quote:
Most rational drug design efforts assume the target protein exists in a single structure and that the structure of one region of the protein--called the active site--allows the protein to perform some function. Once this assumption is made, the only way to manipulate a proteins activity is with inhibitors that bind the active site tightly enough to block it from performing its intended function. Unfortunately, this strategy only works for ~15% of proteins, greatly limiting the number of proteins we can manipulate for therapeutic purposes.

In a recent article published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (link), I showed that simulations run on Folding@home can reveal new ways of manipulating a protein's activity. Specifically, I start off by recognizing that proteins are actually flexible and then use Folding@home to enumerate the different conformations a protein adopts. I then use statistical analysis to find parts of the protein that can communicate with the active site through a process called allostery. These regions--called allosteric sites--are attractive drug targets as the binding of small molecules to them can be communicated to the active site, ultimately affecting activity.


Full Article here.



Bonus for A4-core based projects

Quote:
We've noticed a significant number of high priority projects are trailing behind existing projects. Newer projects are aimed at interpreting and guiding experiments where the full power of Folding@home (F@h) is essential to continue pushing the boundaries of scientific and medical discoveries.

The main cause of this issue is the core version needed to run these simulations. Many of our newer SMP projects use the A4 core, which has several scientific advancements, while existing projects use the still important A3 core. The A4 core is not compatible with Clients below version 6.34 and many donors are still running these older Client versions.


Full Article here.



New GPU-powered algorithms

Quote:
Guest post from Dr. Xuhui Huang, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

In this post, I want to introduce a new GPU-powered clustering algorithm we recently developed to analyze the large molecular dynamics simulation datasets generated by Folding@home. Folding@home can generate enormous sets of protein structures. A critical step in analyzing these large datasets involves some form of reduction in the dataset, usually in the form of clustering. We recently developed a GPU powered clustering algorithm using the intrinsic properties of a metric space to rapidly accelerate the clustering. Overall, our algorithm is up to two orders of magnitude faster than the CPU implementation, and holds even more promise with the ever increasing performance in GPU hardware.


Full Article here.



Slow unfolded-state structuring revealed by simulation and experiment

Quote:
Guest post from Dr. Vincent Voelz, Temple University

Using protein folding simulations alongside experiments remains challenging because the two techniques often "see" very different things. Simulation trajectories "see" every atom in a single protein in microscopic detail, while experiments often "see" only bulk properties averaged over large ensembles of molecules. For example, in the last few years, we have built kinetic network models of ever larger and slower-folding proteins. These models can have huge numbers of states and many possible folding pathways, yet experimental folding kinetics can be fit to models having only two or three states.


Full Article here.
FAHcon2012
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,740,251
Work Units: 6,437

Posted: Fri Jun 29, 2012 12:52 am
It has been a busy month for Stanford and the F@HCon.

Quote:
We just had a protein folding conference at Stony Brook University in New York that was extremely encouraging. Both the experimental and theoretical communities are very excited about the results we are generating with Folding@home. In particular, they are excited about (i) our increasing ability to make quantitative connections with experiments and (ii) the long timescale dynamics for large proteins we are now able to capture. For example, we recently succeeded in folding an 80-residue protein on 10 millisecond timescales.


Full Article here


Quote:
To start off FAHcon2012, I gave a talk which included a review of how far Folding@home has come in the last decade. I showed a slide from the very first talk I gave about Folding@home results. That talk was given at Columbia University in August of 2000, and I talked about results from our paper in Science entitled "Screen savers of the world, unite!". That work described the folding of a very small protein (16 amino acids) on a very short timescale (10ns = 10 x 10^-9 seconds!), but still was a major accomplishment for the time.

It's exciting to see how far we've come. One way to think about it is in terms of how long of a time scale and length scale we can simulate for protein folding and protein misfolding diseases (such as Aß aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease):

Time scales: advancing roughly 1000x every 5 years

2000: 1 to 10ns (Fs peptide)

2005: 1 to 10s (villin, Aß aggregation of 4 chains)

2010: 1 to 10ms (NTL9, Lambda repressor)

2015: 1 to 10s?

Just breaking past a microsecond was a big deal. The fact that we can simulate 10's of milliseconds is very exciting, but I'm really excited about where this appears to be leading, allowing us to tackle really challenging and important problems. It would also mean that through a combination of new methods, algorithms, and hardware advances, we've already increased our capabilities by a million fold in just 10 years (2000 to 2010). We're looking forward to hopefully making it a billion fold in 2015!


Full Article here



Quote:
Here's a guest post from Prof. Dr. Xuhui Huang, from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology.

I had a great time attending the first annual FAH conference and enjoyed the nice summer weather in the Bay area. We had plenty of discussions on the recent progress and future plans of FAH on both scientific and technique sides. I look forward to the future FAH conferences.

In my talk, I reported recent results on two projects from our lab. The first one is the development of a new algorithm for the automatic construction of Markov State Model to investigate the conformational dynamics of multi-body systems. This new algorithm holds great potential to help elucidate the aggregation mechanisms of multiple misfolded peptides to form oligomers and eventually fibrils. In the future, we plan to apply this algorithm to study the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) peptides, and its aggregation may result in reducing working &#946;-cells in the Type 2 diabetes patients.


Full Article here




Quote:
Dr. Snow, a new investigator at Colorado State University, gave a presentation focused on upcoming research. A unifying theme of this research is the engineering of new, synthetic proteins with applications in bioenergy & medicine. Specifically, Snow and colleagues are using computational protein design to engineer new cellulase enzymes for more efficient and economical biofuel production. To facilitate these calculations, the Snow group is developing software (SHARPEN) that could be deployed on the Folding@Home network. The technical barriers to developing a SHARPEN F@h core were discussed. Notably, F@h can still contribute to these design problems using existing molecular dynamics simulations.


Full Article here





Folding@home Consortium Conference 2012
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,740,251
Work Units: 6,437

Posted: Wed May 30, 2012 04:06 am
Quote:
Here's a guest post from Dr. Greg Bowman about FAHcon 2012.

I had the opportunity to present two projects at the first Folding@home conference (which was a terrific event!). The first project focused on new protein therapeutics. It has long been known that a protein called IL-2 can help stimulate an immune response, so in theory giving people with diseases like immune deficiencies IL-2 could be tremendously helpful.


Full Article here.


Quote:
On Friday May 25 at Stanford University, we had the first "all-hands on deck" scientific conference for the Folding@home Consortium. The goals were to discuss recent scientific advances, share new techniques for how to better use FAH, as well as to plan for new infrastructure advancements in FAH for the next year.


Full Article here.
Peptoids
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,740,251
Work Units: 6,437

Posted: Tue Apr 24, 2012 04:28 pm
It has been a very busy month for Stanford, several new articles and support for new CPUS has been added to the folding client.

Peptoids

Quote:
One of the projects we're excited about in the Voelz Lab is molecular simulation of synthetic polymers called peptoids. These are biomimetic molecules that can fold like proteins, but they have different structural properties. Several peptoids have been identified that can fold into unique three-dimensional structures, but better computational modeling is needed to identify the driving forces for folding and predict stable peptoid structures. If we can develop tools to do this, peptoids have the potential to be an amazing platform to design functionalized nanostructures that can be used for all kinds of applications, from biotherapeutics to nanomaterials.


Full Article here




Introducing the Voelz lab at Temple, a new member of the FAH Consortium

Quote:
The Voelz Lab just started this past August in the Department of Chemistry at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA. We have just installed two Folding@home servers, and are gearing up to run simulations this summer (which I hope to talk about in future blog posts). In the meantime we have been very lucky to work with the Institute for Computational Molecular Science here at Temple, and a new high-peformance computing cluster to generate some initial data.

One of our interests is using molecular simulation to do computational design of folding and binding properties. Design efforts require looking at folding for lots of different possible protein sequences, which is a natural task for a distributed computing platform like Folding@home. We're working on ways to leverage Markov State Models of conformational dynamics to do efficient estimation of the effects of sequence perturbations. A good starting point to test these ideas are to look at proteins for which many sequences have been characterized, to see if we can predict sequence-dependent changes. Many of these sequence mutations are important in human diseases, so we hope to gain insight into these process as well.


Full Article here




Understanding the folding of hIAPP, the peptide linked to the Type 2 diabetes

Quote:
In addition to the molecular recognition processes, another project his lab is working on at the Folding@home platform is to explore the folding free energy landscape of the human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP). hIAPP (also called amylin) is a 37-residue peptide and its aggregation reduces working &#946;-cells in patients with Type 2 diabetes. As an intrinsically disordered protein, hIAPP monomer does not have a folded global minimum in its folding free energy landscape, but contains many stable local minimums. Thus understanding the nature of these locally metastable states can help us to understand the mechanisms of the hIAPP aggregation, and further design small molecules to inhibit the amyloid formation.[/url]

Full Article




Support for new GPUs (such as Kepler) in the v7 FAH client

[quote]In the past, support for specific GPUs was built into the client. We are working on ways to automatically update this information more easily within the v7 client to support new GPUs, such as the Kepler GPUs which have just came out. While the automatic update isn't ready yet, here is how one can manually do this:

1) Download the GPUs.txt file from [url=https://fah-web.stanford.edu/file-releases/public/GPUs.txt]here


2) Copy the downloaded GPUs.txt file to the client's run directory. The run directory is also called the data directory. In Windows there is a link to this directory in the start menu.

3) After installing the file you must restart your client.

The client has a built-in GPUs.txt which it will use if it does not find one on disk. The client will print a message to the log, very early on, when it reads GPUs.txt from the run directory.

In a future version of the v7 client, this will happen automatically, but for now, we are updating this file on our web site and donors can do this update manually for new hardware.


Full Article here




Receptor Binding by the Influenza Virus

Quote:
The Kasson group has recently published an article in the journal Biochemistry on how influenza binds cell-surface receptors. In this article, we discuss how computational techniques can be used for further analysis of structural and biochemical data on glycan binding by influenza. We review prior work that we have done in collaboration with the Pande group, including research using Folding@home.


Full Article here
Folding@Home v7 Released
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 98
Points: 2,740,251
Work Units: 6,437

Posted: Tue Mar 27, 2012 09:29 am
It's been a busy month at Stanford.

Folding@Home v7 release

Quote:
This new client is a complete rewrite with the intention to make it much easier for donors to contribute to Folding@home. In particular, the new client unifies the classic, SMP, and GPU clients into a single download. Also, installation (especially of the more high performance clients such as SMP and GPU) is much easier than before. Finally, the revamped viewer should also be a much better user experience for FAH donors.


Download the new client here


FAH simulations lead to a new therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's Disease

Quote:
I'm very excited to finally talk about some key new results from our lab. These results have been a long time in coming and in many ways represents a major achievement for Folding@home (FAH) in general, demonstrating that the approach we started 10 years ago can make significant steps forward in our long term goals.

Specifically, our long term goals have been to 1) develop new methods to tackle the computational challenges of simulating protein folding; 2) apply these methods to gain new insights into protein folding; 3) use these methods and new insights to simulate Aß protein misfolding, a key process in the toxicity of Alzheimer's Disease (AD); and finally 4) to use those simulations to develop new small molecule drug candidates for AD. In the early years of FAH, we concentrated on the first two goals above. In the last 5-7 years, we have worked to accomplish the third goal. I'm now very excited to report our progress on the last goal using FAH for the development of new therapeutic strategies for AD.


Full article here


Stanford scientists and collaborators boost potency, reduce side effects of IL-2 protein used to treat cancer

Quote:
The utility of a naturally occurring protein given, sometimes to great effect, as a drug to treat advanced cancers is limited by the severe side effects it sometimes causes. But a Stanford University School of Medicine scientist has generated a mutant version of the protein whose modified shape renders it substantially more potent than the natural protein while reducing its toxicity.


Full article here


  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 153
  • Pages: 31
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