Links : [H]ard|Folding [H]ard|OCP
Local

Pacific

Mountain

Central

Eastern

GMT

[H] Member Login

Remember

Stanford's goal: to understand protein folding, protein aggregation, and related diseases.



What are proteins and why do they "fold"? Proteins are biology's workhorses -- its "nanomachines." Before proteins can carry out their biochemical function, they remarkably assemble themselves, or "fold." The process of protein folding, while critical and fundamental to virtually all of biology, remains a mystery. Moreover, perhaps not surprisingly, when proteins do not fold correctly (i.e. "misfold"), there can be serious effects, including many well known diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Mad Cow (BSE), CJD, ALS, and Parkinson's disease.

What does Folding@Home do? Folding@Home is a distributed computing project which studies protein folding, misfolding, aggregation, and related diseases. Stanford uses novel computational methods and large scale distributed computing, to simulate timescales thousands to millions of times longer than previously achieved. This has allowed us to simulate folding for the first time, and to now direct Stanford's approach to examine folding related disease.



How to Join | Project Faqs | Project Add-ons | Statistics | Download Client
New Members
[ 3 ]
 Ghoti3307/30/14 
 MarioG07/27/14 
 Hippiekiller07/26/14 
Merck Serono initiates phase II study of anti-PD-L1 antibody MSB0010718C in metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma
Genetic mutations linked to salivary gland tumors
Radiation therapy best practices and quality standards
Endoscopic resection not always best for localized, early-stage esophageal cancer
New test for thyroid cancer increases odds of correct surgery
Some cancer cells are characterized by both high sugar intake and high mobility
Cancer cells allowed to divide even when oxygen-starved by cell's recycling center
Childhood cancer survivors may avoid metabolic syndrome by following a healthy lifestyle
'Five portions of fruit and veg a day are enough'
Could a 'universal' blood test for cancer be on the horizon?
Is the European Union putting cancer research at risk?
Experts at the American Brain Tumor Association's annual conference report findings and dispel myths
Cancer can be driven by epigenetic changes
Nanoparticle stimulate anti-tumor immune responses
SapC-DOPS selectively targets tumor cells in models with brain micrometastases derived from human breast or lung cancer cells
Key molecule identified in flies that adjusts energy use under starvation conditions
New drug target can break down cancer's barrier against treatment
One third of cancer patients are killed by a 'fat-burning' process termed cachexia related to obesity, CNIO researchers say
Treatment identified that prevents tumor metastasis
The "stemness" of individual immune memory cells: a fundamental finding with implications for clinical cell therapy
Protection for skin during cancer radiotherapy provided by natural products from plants
Identifying the carcinogenic potential of chemicals
Study reveals the atomic structure of key muscle component
Cancer drug offers potential for an oral therapy for Alzheimer's disease
New computational method pinpoints gene changes in breast cancer cells
Potential biomarker identified for Alzheimer's disease
UEA research finds hope for more accurate diagnosis of memory problems
Research letter examines pacemaker use in patients with cognitive impairment
Dementia 'predicted by slow walking speed and memory problems'
Protein S100B in blood may trigger brain-damaging immune response
Klotho found to be neuroprotective against Alzheimer's disease
Research letter examines pacemaker use in patients with cognitive impairment
Experiences at every stage of life contribute to cognitive abilities in old age
Dementia carers need more medication support, report says
Treatment identified that prevents tumor metastasis
Cancer drug offers potential for an oral therapy for Alzheimer's disease
New mechanism found for neurodegeneration
Therapies focus on areas of memory and learning in the brain to treat obesity
Deleting enzyme favorably impacts behaviors associated with Fragile X syndrome
Potential genetic link found between epilepsy and neurodegenerative disorders
The future of gene therapy for Alzheimer's disease
Explaining the molecular basis of age-related memory loss
Immune cell discovered that plays neuroprotective role in the brain
Amyloid plaque in Alzheimer's disease may affect remote regions of the brain
In older patients with mild cognitive impairment, acupuncture at the Taixi activates cerebral neurons
Are life expectancy increases among older Americans slowing?
Enzyme linked to Alzheimer's disease
Social contact, peer support and self-help can positively benefit people with dementia
Human neurodegenerative diseases may be impacted by discovery of a new cellular garbage control pathway
Two-way interaction between neurons and astrocytes plays an important role in the processes of learning and memory
Video explains why dogs smell each other's behinds
Cancer cells allowed to divide even when oxygen-starved by cell's recycling center
"Killer sperm" prevents mating between worm species
One third of cancer patients are killed by a 'fat-burning' process termed cachexia related to obesity, CNIO researchers say
Forensic investigations often use dead body feeding larvae
Mathematical modelling could pave way for new chlamydia therapies
High-speed chemical imaging of tissues using enhanced NIST instrument
How gold nanoparticles easily penetrate cells, making them useful for delivering drugs
New light shed on primate biology and evolution
Speedy cell by cell reconstruction of an animal's development made possible by imaging technology
Newly-discovered process helps drosophila cope when temperatures get cold
Distinctive developmental origin for a drainage tube in the eye
Researchers identify more than 80 new genes linked to schizophrenia
Life's imprint on DNA now mappable in single cell
Calorie restriction with resveratrol key to kick-starting cell health
Biomedical technologies may be improved by protein in squid skin
Gene identified that controls the timing of precisely ordered events during maturation
Structure of protein vital to cancer development is mapped
Scientists find ancient protein-building enzymes have undergone metamorphosis and evolved diverse new functions
Findings could revolutionise our understanding of timing during development
Study finds friends are genetically similar
New study reveals how cholesterol promotes cancer
Revolutionary technology enables scientists to navigate and analyze complex 3D images
New technology reveals insights into mechanisms underlying amyloid diseases
Wild gorillas provide compelling evidence of olfactory communication in hominoids
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 157
  • Pages: 32
Protein In The Brain Could Be A Key Target In Controlling Alzheimer's
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 102
Points: 2,819,396
Work Units: 6,609

Posted: Sun Jan 29, 2012 06:43 pm
This has been a relatively quiet month, there has been no new news released by the Stanford folding team, so there is not much I can report.

However I did run across this interesting Alzheimer's news article.

Quote:
A protein recently discovered in the brain could play a key role in regulating the creation of amyloid beta, the major component of plaques implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers at Temple University's School of Medicine.

A group led by Domenico Pratico, professor of pharmacology and microbiology and immunology at Temple, discovered the presence of the protein, called 12/15-Lipoxygenase, in the brain three years ago.

"We found this protein to be very active in the brains of people who have Alzheimer's disease," said Pratico. "But three years ago, we didn't know the role it played in the development of the disease."

Following two years of study, the Temple researchers have found that the protein is at the top of a pathway and controls a biochemical chain reaction that begins the development of Alzheimer's.


Full Article here
Multiple Myeloma First Risk Genes Discovered
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 102
Points: 2,819,396
Work Units: 6,609

Posted: Thu Dec 29, 2011 07:55 pm
It's been a rather slow month for news.

Stanford has finished their stats re-credit, they ask that you let them know if there is still problems.


On the cancer news front

Quote:
According to a paper published online in Nature Genetics, a team of scientists led by The Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) has demonstrated for the first time that a person's genes influence their risk of developing multiple myeloma, a cancer of plasma cells, which is a type of white blood cell responsible for the production of antibodies.


Full Article here


Also there was a slight problem with the database earlier this month, the site was down for a short time while the issue was dealt with. Everything appears to be back to normal.

Recent video about Folding@home from the Stanford News Service
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 102
Points: 2,819,396
Work Units: 6,609

Posted: Sat Nov 26, 2011 05:25 pm
Stanford has released a video about Folding.



View Video here


Also Stanford has made changes to the "Big Advanced Projects" which will go into effect Jan 16th.


Quote:

Big Advanced (BA) is an experimental type of Folding@home WUs intended for the most powerful machines in FAH. However, as time goes on, technology advances, and the characteristics associated with the most powerful machines changes. Due to these advances in hardware capabilities, we will need to periodically change the BA minimum requirements. Thus, we are shortening the deadlines of the BA projects. As a result, assignments will have a 16 core minimum. To give donors some advance warning, we are announcing this now, but the change will take place in 2 months: no earlier than on Monday January 16, 2012.

We understand that any changes to how FAH works is a disruption for donors, and we have been trying to minimize such changes. For that reason, we are not changing the points system at this time.

However, we want to emphasize that the BA program is experimental and that donors should expect changes in the future, potentially without a lot of notice (although we will try our best to give as much notice as we can). In particular, as hardware evolves, it is expected that we will need to change the nature of the BA WUs again in the future.
Folding Client 7.1.38 Released
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 102
Points: 2,819,396
Work Units: 6,609

Posted: Tue Oct 25, 2011 03:05 pm
A New Folding Client has been released, v7.1.38

Changelog for the last few updates is below.

Quote:
v7.1.38:
Fixed network connection dropping.


v7.1.37:
Added missing wraplabel.py file to FAHControl.
Changed socket error message verbosity.
Fail WU on UNSTABLE_MACHINE immediately & return for partial credit. #615


v7.1.36:
Fixed a potential socket connection bug. Maybe related to #734.
Added several NVidia cards to GPUs.txt. #737.
Improved Linux on battery detection. #738.
Print WU error state on WU status line.
Emit correct exception on FAH transaction failure. #615.
Fixed debian package install core permissions problem. #732.
Removed core byte order warning. #602.
Added GPL link to FAHControl about. #736.
Ask user, team, passkey and mode during .deb package install. #739.


v7.1.35:
Added 'Enchanter' theme. #731
Renamed 'Wimp' to 'Windows-Default'. #731
Unminimize FAHControl window on unhide. #567
Better core download failure message. #161
Cleaned up project descriptions using html2text.py.
Store project data in client DB.
Use system default font size. #733
Added project info to viewer. #575.
Added clickable buttons to viewer.
Fixed FAHViewer crash introduced in v7.1.34.
Fixed mouse wheel scrolling in FAHControl. #463.
Fixed color difference for text boxes. #698.
Changed FAHControl window name. #711.


v7.1.34:
Fixed CPU consumption in client connections. #702
Really fixed "Wrong architecture" bug on 32-bit Ubuntu. #599
Only warn on config errors. #722
Log error and continue of command server fails to initialize.
Fixed Slot configuration text. #717
Use -1 or 0 for CPUs default to be consistent with GPU options. #717
Disabled no longer supported AMD X1300 - 1900 GPUs.
Added "OpenGL Render" to info in FAHViewer. (For blacklisting)
Added 'override-blacklist' option to FAHViewer. (Nothing black listed yet)
'OK' -> 'Save' in FAHViewer preferences window. #724
Fixed NVIDIA_DEV.1244.01 = "NVIDIA GeForce GTX 550 Ti" detection.
Added the 'Wimp' theme and win32 theme engines. #723
Made 'Wimp' theme the default in Windows. #713
Added heartbeat to viewer<->client connection to timeouts dead connections.
Stop trying FAILED, FAULTY and DUMP reports if WS connection was made. #728
Check WS server versions for unreasonable values. #728.


Client Download: here



Stanford also released a paper showing the Comparison between FAH and Anton's approaches.

Quote:
Right now, the two most powerful supercomputers for studying protein folding are Folding@home and a very impressive special purpose computer from DE Shaw Researched, called ANTON. We're often been asked "how do they compare?" The approaches are very different, so comparisons aren't completely straightforward. ANTON takes the traditional approach to studying protein folding, where one performs a few (often 1 or 2) long trajectories to study the process. Folding@home takes a statistical approach, which has two primary benefits: 1) it can access folding on dramatically longer timescales (milliseconds, instead of microsecond folding events over a single long trajectory) and 2) it can give statistically significant results on those long timescales.

The main concern about the method in FAH is that since it is such a radically new approach, does it work reliably? Previous tests of FAH have been to experiment, which is the gold standard test, but also brings in other issues, such as how good are our models of reality. Thus, while FAH's approach has done well compared to experiment, it is useful to compare FAH and ANTON directly, since they use the same models, etc. Comparison of our statistical approach (using Markov State Models, aka MSMs) directly with data from ANTON would go a long way to showing that the MSM approach works for even non-trivial systems (they have been previously tested for long dynamics on small systems).


Full Article: here


Award-winning research points toward Alzheimers vaccine
King_N
[H]ard|Folding Administrator


Posts: 102
Points: 2,819,396
Work Units: 6,609

Posted: Wed Sep 28, 2011 06:46 pm
There really hasn't been any new news from Stanford this month, however I did run across this article dealing with research that could possibly lead to an Alzheimer's vaccine.

Quote:
AUGUSTA, Ga. An accomplice to the protein that causes plaque buildup in Alzheimers disease is the focus of a potential new treatment, according to research by a Georgia Health Sciences University graduate student.

In Alzheimers, the amyloid protein can accumulate in the brain instead of being eliminated by the bodys natural defenses, nestling between the neurons and forming impassable plaques.

Amyloid and the way it gets there could be targets for a new vaccine.


Full article here.
  • Stickies: 0
  • News Articles: 157
  • Pages: 32
Administrator Council News Member

[H]ard|Folding Copyright © 2001 - 2014 by King_N,   [H]ard|OCP Copyright © 1998 - 2013 by Kyle Bennett

All trademarks used are properties of their respective owners. All rights reserved.