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Friday May 30, 2003

[H]ardNews 3rd Edition

Direct Die Water Cooling:

There are a handful of people in the water cooling world who like the idea of direct die water cooling, the practice of bypassing the use of a water block and just shooting water directly onto the die of the CPU. When done correctly this is an acceptable form of H20 cooling, but it has never gained the popularity of regular water cooling.

I figured shooting the water directly onto the die was the best direction of the incoming coolant, so I started with a 1/2" hose barb. Under this I added a piece of copper tubing that was aimed 1/8" over the die. Using a rotary tool, I ground some flutes that would cause turbulence, which is already well known to increase the cooling capacity of watercooled systems.

No Hard Drive Recall?

Digitimes reported hard drive recalls from several major hard drive manufacturers because of high failure rates of 40GB and 80GB models, which now is apparently being denied. The big three ( Maxtor, Hitachi and Seagate ) have all denied any recall.

We mistakenly reported that most of the defective products came from the same sources in China. The products from China were actually manufactured by different factories. Maxtor does not have hard drives produced in China, but some of its products reportedly are also suffering from unacceptable defect rates due to similar problems.

DVD Cracking Arguments:

The California Attorney General spoke to the California Supreme Court saying that DVD cracking software is a “burglary tool”. Heh, considering most Americans consider the sky high price of going to the movies “highway robbery”, I guess that burglary is par for the course then.

California Attorney General Bill Lockyer called DVD-cracking software DeCSS a tool for "breaking, entering and stealing" during a hearing before the California Supreme Court on Thursday. "The program DeCSS is a burglary tool," Lockyer told the judges, adding that the movie studios lose millions of dollars because of piracy over the Internet.